Scientists have discovered a genetic mutation in a woman who does not feel pain, is never afraid or nervous

A former teacher from Inverness (Scotland) told The Guardian in an interview that she never needed painkillers, despite the fact that in her life there were fractures of the limbs, cuts, burns, and childbirth and numerous operations. "I can accidentally put my hand on a hot stove and realize that something is wrong, only by smell. I am a vegetarian, so the" flavor "is pretty obvious. There’s just no more fried meat in the house."

Joe never panics - even in dangerous situations she is always calm.

Not so long ago, a woman had a serious accident. After Cameron got out of the crumpled car, she rushed to reassure another driver, whose fault caused an accident. Bruises noticed only a few days later.

At the age of 65, Cameron, after several operations, during which she practically did not feel pain, was sent for examination to specialists at the University of California in London. Scientists conducted a genetic analysis and found two noticeable mutations.

An article on the study of Cameron DNA was published in the British Journal of Anaesthesia.

These two mutations collectively suppress pain and anxiety, increase feelings of happiness, and stimulate wound healing. The first mutation is associated with the activity of the FAAH gene - it is responsible for the enzyme that breaks down anandamide. This substance affects the sensation of pain, mood and memory. The more it remains in the body, the less pain a person feels.

The second mutation was the previously unknown FAAH-OUT gene, which regulates the FAAH gene.

"A few years ago I didn’t know that there was something unusual in the absence of pain. I thought it was normal. The knowledge of mutations fascinates me just like any other person. I will be happy if the study helps other people who suffer.

" Scientists adhere to the same opinion. “If we understand how the whole mechanism works, then we may be able to create new painkillers,” says one of the authors of the study.

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