Question: is it possible to eat something that fell to the floor, and how does the “five-second rule” work?

"One-two-three-four-five - the microbes did not have time!" - that sounded one of the rules of our childhood. It meant that if you raise food that fell to the floor for five seconds, then nothing will happen to it and you can safely eat it. The Challenger figured out what was really going on with the food that fell out of your hands.

In the scientific work of a Harvard student

Gillian Clare

(which is so deepened in the “Rule of Five Seconds,” which she even dedicated her thesis to and received the Shnobel Prize for it. - Approx.

ed. ) states that 70% of American women and 56% of men believe that if instantly raise food from the floor, you can eat it, because the bacteria did not have time to "run across" it.

Question: is it possible to eat something that fell to the floor, and how does the “five-second rule” work?

Photo: shutterstock. com

But scientists have a different opinion on this. It is proved that in our homes on all surfaces in dust

hides

about nine thousand microorganisms and more than half of them are bacteria.

True, many bacteria are harmless and accompany us all our lives - for example, they constantly live on human skin. Part of the bacteria comes to us when we

just inhale the air

. At the same time, a person himself every hour throws into the environment about

38 million bacterial cells

.

Jack Gilbert

Environmental Microbiologist at the University of Chicago, Illinois, USA

- Any food that comes into contact with the floor "collects" dirt, dust and, as a result, microbes. It is important to understand that bacteria do not sit on the floor and do not wait for you to drop food to them, they are just everywhere.

That is, in fact, it does not matter where you drop the food: on the floor, on the table, or on your clothes.

The scientist claims that he calmly picks up food from the floor and eats provided that it happened in a relatively clean place - for example, at home.

Jack Gilbert

Environmental Microbiologist at the University of Chicago, Illinois, USA

- If I dropped the chocolate bar into the plague pit, then no, in that case I wouldn’t raise it. But in general, we take dirt too seriously, because you can pick up a pathogen by pure chance at any time and in any circumstances. Some scientists joke that licking a toilet seat will be safer than accidentally licking your smartphone, for example.

There is some truth in this joke.

Question: is it possible to eat something that fell to the floor, and how does the “five-second rule” work?

Photo: shutterstock. com

Nevertheless, one should not forget about common sense: there is no magic barrier between you and the bacterial world. You don’t have to pick up food from the floor, if someone in your family has viral diseases or if you live in a country with

low sanitation

.

Among millions of harmless microorganisms, there are a few dangerous ones.

They can be not only on the floor, but also on the table, chairs, door handles and any other place in the house. In this case, you can become infected even if you never eat food raised from the floor.

Despite

A study of

American scientists, which showed that the risk of contracting food with salmonella five seconds after contact with the pathogen was less than after a minute, most modern scientific sources

confirm

that the number of bacteria on the food does not depend on how long it lay on the floor: a couple of seconds or a minute - the harmful bacteria still reach their goal.

However, there is still a loophole for the Rule supporters: it turns out that the type of floor surface is crucial. As a result of one of the studies, scientists

found out

that the food raised from the carpet contained 1% of all bacteria, and from tile and wood - from 51% to 70%.

Is it possible to eat food that has fallen on the floor? It is possible, but it is necessary to be guided by logic and common sense. If you are at home where it’s clean and no one is sick, nothing will happen to you from eating a sandwich that has been on the floor. But in a public place, such a scheme, of course, does not work.

.

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